Early Disk-Galaxy Formation
from JWST to the Milky Way

Connecting the near and the far.

Abstact submission & registration deadline: Extended to Oct 31, 2022

IAU Symposium 377 @ Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The first IAU conference in Southeast Asia since 1990. The conference will be held in a hybrid mode.

 

6-10 February, 2023
Conference
Jan 31-Feb 4 2023
Monsoon School (there is no winter/summer in Malaysia)

Discussion of first-year JWST data and ALMA data and lessons on high-redshift analogs of the early Milky Way

The Local Group in a cosmology context

A comparative study of surviving dwarf galaxies versus what we have uncovered of cannibalized dwarf galaxies.

The formation and evolution of disk galaxies at high redshifts

 

Investigation of how cosmological simulations

succeed (or not) at predicting the observed properties of galaxies

The role of globular clusters in early structure formation

as inferred from both local group and high-redshift observations.

What present-day Galactic structure, dynamics, and chemistry can teach us about the early formation of the Milky Way

 

Simulations and observations of (local and high redshift) metal-free and nearly metal-free stars

 

Archaeoastronomy of southeast Asia, and history of Islamic astronomy

 

 

Credit: SkyrunMalaysia

Why Malaysia

Malaysia has never previously hosted an IAU (International Astronomical Union) conference, neither have Malaysia’s neighboring countries: Cambodia, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Indonesia last held one in 1990, about 30 years ago. Together, these Southeast Asian countries are home to about 500 million people​, a larger population than the EU. This conference aims to provide ​an opportunity to grow the international astronomical community.

The First-Ever IAU Symposium
in Malaysia
The First-Ever Professional Astronomy Conference
in Malaysia
IAU
sponsored

 

Scientific Rationale

The fields of Galactic archaeology and near-field cosmology have been revolutionized by a plethora of rich data from virtually every observational domain. This breadth from the most ancient field of astronomy (astrometry) to one of the newest (asteroseismology). We now know the precise kinematics, detailed chemical abundances, and approximate ages for millions of stars across much of the Milky Way, from the Bulge to the Solar Neighbourhood through to the Halo. This incredible bounty of astronomical data is accompanied by increasingly sophisticated astrophysical models in hierarchical galaxy assembly, galactic dynamics, stellar evolution, and nucleosynthetic yields.

These resources have led to an emerging picture of the Milky Way's first three billion years. The first phase of star-formation was likely dominated by metal-poor ([Fe/H] <= -3.0) gas and stars, whose chemical abundances represent a zoo in their suggested diversity of early chemical polluters. Some brief time later, the Milky Way formed its first globular clusters, its Bulge, and its Thick Disk, with the earliest phases of that epoch likely having been dominated by globular clusters. Simultaneous to these developments, the early Milky Way experienced several significant accretion events, such as the recently discovered systems Gaia-Enceladus and Sequoia. We can trace these structures dynamically, and chemically, and we may even be able to identify which globular clusters belonged to them. These accretion and dissolution events stand in contrast to the Milky Way’s puzzlingly quiescent state today.

In parallel to these developments in Galactic astronomy, the field of galaxy formation is also undergoing a revolution due to high-redshift data from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). This progress will soon be accelerated by data from the Christmas 2021 launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The question of how galaxies form and evolve will be constrained by a deluge of information from the earliest epochs, which will be both challenging and fascinating to analyze, interpret, and understand. We will ascertain the spread in abundances of gas at the same early cosmological epoch, the structural state of galaxies when the progenitors of globular clusters are driving the first significant star formation events, and the mass distribution of star formation events at high redshift. JWST will also probe the stellar mass functions of low-metallicity stellar populations, enabling new insights into the physical processes that drive the formation of stars and the resulting chemical enrichment of the universe.

Magnificent data (from both the Local Group and the high-redshift Universe) and state-of-the-art models are optimally insightful when used together. Given recent developments, the time is now to bring in experts from these three areas (Galactic astronomy, high-redshift astronomy, and theory and modeling of galaxy formation and evolution). The conference will enable a more holistic understanding of the Milky Way's and all disk galaxies’ early star formation and structural assembly.

Meet The Organizers

Prof. Yuan-Sen Ting

Australian National University

(SOC Chair, LOC Chair)

Dr. David Nataf

Johns Hopkins University

(SOC Chair)

Fairos Asillam

National Platenarium

(LOC Chair)

SOC Members

Prof. Amina Helmi University of Groningen

Prof. Akio Inoue Waseda University

Dr. Shigeki Inoue National Astronomical Observatory of Japan / University of Tsukuba

Dr. Susan Kassin Space Telescope Science Institute

Prof. Chiaki Kobayashi University of Hertfordshire

Prof. Chin-Fei LeeAcademia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics

Prof. Khee-Gan LeeKavli IPMU

Prof. Roberto Maiolino University of Cambridge

Prof. Dante Minniti Universidad Andres Bello

Dr. Premana Wardayanti Premadi Institut Teknologi Bandung

Prof. Alvio Renzini Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova

Prof. Dan Weisz University of California Berkeley

Prof. Rosemary Wyse Johns Hopkins University

Prof. Xiang-Xiang Xue National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Prof. Gail Zasowski University of Utah

LOC Members

Prof. Zamri Zainal Abidin University of Malaya

Affan Adly University of Malaya

Norsyazwani Asmi National Planetarium

Nurul Husna Mohammad Bokhari KU Leuven

Hidayah Ismail University of Malaya

Abdul Kadir University of Malaya

Jia Wei Teh University of Heidelberg

Ahmad Najwan Zulkiplee University of Malaya

Editor of Proceedings

Prof. Beatriz Barbuy Universidade de São Paulo

Prof. Fatemeh Tabatabaei Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, Iran

Meet The Speakers

Confirmed Invited Speakers

Shany Danieli

Princeton University

Karl Glazebrook

Swinburne University of Technology

Robert Grand

Canaries Institute for Astrophysics

Takuya Hashimoto

University of Tsukuba

Paul Ho

East Asian Observatory

Miho Ishigaki

Kavli IPMU

Nurul Fatini Jaafar

University of Malaya

Susan Kassin

Space Telescope Science Institute

Janice Lee

NOIRLab

Haining Li

National Astronomical Observatory of China

Arianna Long

University of Texas at Austin

Jessica Lu

University of California, Berkeley

Yao-Yuan Mao

University of Utah

Anna Fabiola Marino

INAF Firenzo

David Nidever

Montana State University

Sally Oey

University of Michigan

Hafiz Saadon

University of Malaya

Alessandro Savino

University of California, Berkeley

Irene Shivaei

University of Arizona

Eros Vanzella

INAF Bologna

Long Wang

Sun Yat-sen University

David Weinberg

The Ohio State University

Simon White

Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik

Christina C. Williams

University of Arizona
Conference Venue

In The Best
Venue of Kuala Lumpur


Pullman Kuala Lumpur

No 1, Jalan Pantai Baharu, Jaya Tower 3
59200 Kuala Lumpur,
Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur

View Location

Program

(Preliminary)

Yuan-Sen Ting & David Nataf

ANU / JHU

Conference Opening

9:00am

Albert Einstein

IAS, Princeton

Simulations and observations (local and high redshift) of metal-free and nearly metal-free stars

Morning Session

TBD

TBD

Poster Session

Post-Lunch Session

Nancy Roman

NASA

Discussion of first-year JWST data and ALMA data and lessons on high-redshift analogs of the early Milky Way Part 1

Afternoon Session

TBD

TBD

Discussion of first-year JWST data and ALMA data and lessons on high-redshift analogs of the early Milky Way, Part 1

Morning Session

TBD

TBD

Archaeoastronomy of southeast Asia, and history of Islamic astronomy

Post-Lunch Session

TBD

TBD

Recent developments in the formation and evolution of disk galaxies at high redshifts

Afternoon Session

TBD

TBD

Investigation of how cosmological simulations succeed (or not) at predicting the observed properties of galaxies

Morning Session

Free afternoon to explore Kuala Lumpur

All day

TBD

TBD

Discussion of first-year JWST data and ALMA data and lessons on high-redshift analogs of the early Milky Way, Part 2

Morning Session

TBD

TBD

Poster Session

Post-Lunch Session

TBD

TBD

The role of globular clusters in early structure formation as inferred from both local group and high-redshift observations

Afternoon Session

TBD

TBD

The Local Group in a cosmology context, and a comparative study of surviving dwarf galaxies versus what we have uncovered of cannibalized dwarf galaxies

Morning Session

TBD

TBD

What present-day Galactic structure, dynamics, and chemistry can and cannot teach us about the early formation of the Milky Way, Part 2

Afternoon Session

Photo Gallery

Registration

Registration is now extended!

Note: The conference will be in a hybrid mode. But we strongly encourage people to join in person to celebrate in the beautiful country of Malaysia. The registration applies to all participants.

Abstract submission deadline: Oct 31, 2022
Registration deadline: Oct 31, 2022

Local Registration

350 MYR
115 AUD
80 USD
  • Special rate will be applied to people currently living in Southeast Asia
  • Students can apply for a limited number of fee waivers (please write to the organizers, and if possible, present your case)
  • Including lunch and coffee
  • Conference dinner at the renowned Chef Wan's Restaurant (+45 MYR/15 AUD/10 USD)
Register

Submit Abstract

Standard Registration

1550 MYR
500 AUD
350 USD
  • Students can apply for a limited number of fee waivers (please write to the organizers, and if possible, present your case)
  • Including lunch and coffee
  • Conference dinner at the renowned Chef Wan's Restaurant (+220 MYR/70 AUD/50 USD)
Register

Submit Abstract

Monsoon School

Free
  • Priority will be given to students in Southeast Asia.
  • The school will be strictly in person.
  • Note that monsoon school students will still need to register for the conference separately
  • Including lunch and coffee
Register

Companion Conference and Monsoon School

The Global Malaysian Astronomy Convention, a conference celebrating works from Malaysian astronomers worldwide, will be held around the same time. Join us there too.

Jan 31-Feb 4, 2023

Monsoon/"Winter" School

The school syllabus will be updated soon.

Jan 13-18, 2023

Global Malaysian Astronomy Convention

Frequently Asked Questions

Everything you need to know about Malaysia.

Malaysia is a tropical country, in fact Kuala Lumpur is located a mere 4 degrees north from the equator. The typical temperature is 30 Celcius (85 F) in the daytime and 25 Celcius (75 F) at night. But Malaysians hate heat as much as you, so the country is filled, literally, with air conditioners. So you should wear casual when you go outside, but just wear as you usually would indoors. In fact, most Malaysian shopping malls are notoriously cold with the AC, so bring your autumn jacket.

We are proud to be a multi-ethnic country. The multi-ethnicity is largely because Malaysia (in particular, the Strait of Malacca) was the central hub of commerce in the 1400-1500s. Many Chinese and Indians came here to do business and subsequently stayed here since. During the colonial time (Malaysia was basically colonized by everyone - Portugese, Spanish, Dutch, British), many Chineses and Indians were also brought here by the colonizers (especially British) to build the railroads. The current racial composition is about 65% Malay, 25% Chinese, 7% Indian, and a small population of indigenous people (about 0.7% in the peninsula and 11% in the Borneo island).

The organizers are still frantically gathering information on this question.

Durian is commonly known as the "king of all fruits," but is also highly polarized. Some people find it extraordinarily fragrant, and some find it pungent beyond belief. In fact, Singapore bans durian across all public transport because it is too smelly. Durian was produced mostly in Malaysia and Thailand, but it has gained popularity in large parts of Asia in recent years. Some countries are so into durian that durian is made into almost everything imaginable -- durian pizza, durian milkshake, durian mooncake, durian puff. You name it. And yes, you can use durian as a physical defense weapon (Google it).

Since Malaysian is a multi-ethnic country, most Malaysians speak about 2-5 languages (including dialects). Nearly all Malaysians speak decent English and Malay (part of the Austronesian [Malayo-Polynesian] language family). On top of that, most Malaysian Chinese also speak proper Mandarin and at least a few dialects (mainly Cantonese, Hokkien, Hakka in Kuala Lumpur). Many Malaysian Indians also speak fluent Tamils and sometimes Hindu. It should be noted that, while most Malaysians can speak proper English (after all, we were part of the British colony until 1957 -- and yes, you might find older generation to speak fluent English because of that), it is not uncommon for Malaysians to mix three or more languages (in a single sentence!) in verbal communication. And that can be confusing if you are not used to it.

Food. Here is a non-exhaustive list: Nasi Lemak (Malay), Laksa (Malay), Rendang (Malay), Satay (Malay), Roti Canai (Indian), Roti Tissue (Indian), Nasi Briyani (Indian), Chow Kuay Teow (Chinese), Hokkien Mee (Chinese), Popiah (Chinese), Pan Mee (Chinese). You can thank us later.

The living expense in Kuala Lumpur (even being one of the most expensive cities in Malaysia) is still highly affordable. You can get a decent restaurant meal at about 5 USD, and probably even cheaper in a night market. A metro ticket is about 1 USD, and a short taxi ride is about 5 USD.

Since Malaysia is a multi-cultural country with a vast population of international travelers, most foreigners do not find any problem traveling in Malaysia. We do note that different people in Malaysia might have different restrictions. For example, Muslims cannot drink alcohol. That said, alcohol is accessible for other populations in Malaysia (and hence foreigners). There is also a decent population of vegetarians in Malaysia (e.g., Buddhism). The important thing is to be mindful -- for instance, you might want to consider other places than an alcohol bar when bringing your ethnic Malay friends for a science chat. But need not worry, Malaysians are very easy to get along with because of our upbringing -- we are very used to discussing our differences openly and restrictions (if any).

Download The Resources

Travel information and presentations deck.

Travel Guide

Malaysia's multi-ethnicity and multi-cultural background (Malay, Chinese, Indian) has cultivated one of the most unique cuisines with bold flavors. As the travel guide said, "eat until you explode."

Link 1 Link 2

Speakers' powerpoints

Will be uploaded during the conference

Download

Get In Touch

We want to hear from you.